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Specialized Kodak Xray Sensor Technician Now In House

Specialized Kodak Xray Sensor Technician Now In House

We get tons of your digital x-ray sensors in for repair every week and we love it.  Right now dental xray sensor repair turnaround from our receipt to repair to your door is approximately 14 business days, sometimes longer for certain repairs.  We’ve grown our staff and have started working on different ways to increase production, decrease turnaround time, and still push out high quality digital xray sensor repairs.

We’ve been fortunate enough to recruit a Kodak x-ray sensor technician to help our team out with repairing Kodak and Carestream digital x-ray sensors for all of our Kodak dental offices!  He will be handling only Kodak / Carestream digital xray sensors and nothing else. In conjunction with working daily to push out quality sensor repair our Kodak technician will also be training a few of our other technicians how to repair Kodak sensors.  This will put our Kodak repair quality at the top!

This is great news for us and all of our Kodak / Carestream x-ray sensor clients.  Having a specialized Kodak repair technician in house means that we can continue to put out high quality digital dental xray sensor repairs for you and it cuts our sensor repair turn around time for Kodak sensors in half!

If you’re one of our other sensor clients don’t fret!  We still have technicians that can repair any of your Dexis, Schick, Eva, XDR, Camsight, Suni, etc digital xray sensors!  Plus we are working on recruiting even more specialized xray sensor technicians from all of the major sensor companys so that we can spread our high quality sensor repair to other markets!

Want more information about our dental digital x-ray sensor repair?  Check out our digital sensor repair page to find out how you can get your sensor repaired at a fraction of the cost of a new or refurbished sensor!

Electronic Sig Pads: Can a Signature Be Forged?

Electronic Sig Pads: Can a Signature Be Forged?

Did you know that a Topaz signature pad does much more than just capture a signature?

Signature pads are becoming more and more common in dental practices, especially due to the Electronic Records Mandate that is soon to come.  I was posed with an interesting question today that I had never before thought to ask, “If a signature is combated, how would one determine whether an electronic signature is a forgery since it is simply an electronic representation of a person’s signature and not physically in ink on a piece of paper?”

Ever since America was established there have been people forging signatures and because of this there have been forensic document examiners analyzing these signatures to determine a forgery from a legit signature.  According to Mr William J. Flynn, B.S., D-ABFDE, forensic document examiners across the US have had to continually adapt their analysis techniques over the years due to new technology in ink pens.  Prior to the 1940’s the way one would write was via fountain pen or the good old Eagle feather, in 1945 the ball point pen was adapted as the writing instrument of choice.  The fountain pen provided very specific characteristics to a person’s signature such as a writing line with specific shading caused by the flexing of the fountain pens tip of which a ball point pen does not have and now in the 2000′s we face the advent of electronic signatures.

Topaz Systems Inc has been working with Mr William J. Flynn to produce signature pads that have the ability to record much more information about a person’s signature than simply the visual aspect.  Mr William J. Flynn, “the Topaz software [presents in a unique and patent pending way the segment timing, speed of signature data and] … the exact sequence of movements made by the author during the original signature execution.”

What this means is that the Topaz software is able to record all of these movements and time stamps, decipher, analyze, and generate a report for a forensic document examiner to use in determining the authenticity of a signature.  A forged signature is usually created by either tracing an existing signature or simply trying to re-create the signature by memory.  Either way, the characteristics of a forged signature is either “accurate and slow or fast but inaccurate”.  The Topaz software is able to record the time that it takes someone to write their signature which means that a side by side comparison of a legit signature and a forgery will be quick and simple because the signature will either appear visually correct but the time stamp slower or the time stamp will be correct but the signature will be completely visually inaccurate.

Of course the speed at which someone generates a signature is not the only charecteristic considered when analyzing possible forgeries.  Some other items include the accurate representation of the writing shapes, sizes, connecting strokes, and proportions of the original signature.  All of these things are recorded by a Topaz signature pad and is retrievable for a forensic examiner if the need ever arises.

To know that the Topaz signature pads are able to provide this type of security to a dental practice is very relieving.  I can suggest Topaz signature pads to all of my dentists with full confidence that they are protected from people providing false information in the form of a signature.

 

To read Mr William J. Flynn’s Excerpt on Forensic and Biometric Handwriting Analysis of Electronic Digitally Captured Signatures please visit the web page here.

What to do with old equipment after going digital

What to do with old equipment after going digital

We have been having a lot of my clients come to me with the issue of getting rid of their old working equipment when they make the move to digital.

There are a whole bunch of options and few of them work well.

Craigslist, Ebay, Hoping and Praying and donating.

I know of lots of offices that have tried all four options. The problem in most cases is the dentist does not have time to sit around answering the constant craigslist and ebay questions that come through every day.

Questions like:

“Will you guarantee it working when I get in my office?”

“Will this unit work with XYZ other unit or software?”

“Can I pick up the unit at your office?”

The problem with it is that you have to keep up on these questions or you will never sell the item because everyone has a question even good purchasers. Also, no one wants someone showing up at your practice after the sale to complain this or that doesn’t work. Charities are also often difficult to donate to because they will often need  you to bring the equipment to them which can be very inconvenient for the doctor, because it means he has to pay to get rid of the equipment.

I don’t know how many other companies do this, but we have started offering the service of helping dentists resell their equipment. We certify the equipment in a working state and handle the sale through our office so that all of the question and possible complaints come to us and don’t show up at the dental offices door. We think the fairest way to do this is to handle the whole sale and take a percentage of the sale. We then handle all the packing and shipping of the items. In some cases we are able to get much more value for the equipment by offering installation services with the sale.

We started doing this because far too many usable pieces of equipment were just getting scrapped. For dentists that need parts to repair their existing equipment or are just in a location where the practice can’t support new equipment purchases these sales can save a practice.

We feel this can be the best solution to recycling your old equipment. Taking a perfectly good film pano and turning it back into a lump of steel is no way to get the value back out of your old equipment.

We also provide this service for digital X-Ray units, Intra Oral Camera Units, film processors and other high tech devices.

Call 800-821-8962 Ext 2 and ask for refurbished equipment and they can take care of you.

Week 4 – Digital Intra Oral X-Ray Sensors – The Good The Bad And The Ugly – Part 4

Week 4 – Digital Intra Oral X-Ray Sensors – The Good The Bad And The Ugly – Part 4

Digital Intra Oral X-Ray Sensors

-Good Image Quality – Part 1
-Reliability – Part 2
-Price – Part 3
-Functionality – Part 4

Part 4 Functionality

Reviewed Sensors:
-Eva by Dent-X (AFP Imaging)
-SuniRay-Suni Corporation (Orange Dental)
-Dixi 3-Planmeca
-Dexis Platinum-Dexis
-CDR Elite-Schick
-Kodak RVG6100- Kodak (Owned By Carestream Now)

Part 4: Functionality

In this article I wish to discuss how a sensor can be connected into your computer systems, what software the sensors will work with and any particular data that might be of interest as far as the sensors use.
-Eva by Dent-X (AFP Imaging)


This sensor connects to an inexpensive and durable interface that can be mounted on the wall or under a counter. The interface connects to your computer through USB. The interface in this design is not intended to be moved from room to room and because of this the interface is sold rather inexpensively at around $300. The interface itself can be 16 feet from the computer because of the limitations of USB. I have not had good luck with attaching this interface through a powered extension. To be sure of good reliability I would advise to limit yourself to mounting the interface within the 16ft limitation. The sensor then plugs into the interface and give you roughly 6 feet of cable to work with. If your room has pass through xray tube heads I would advice running the usb cable through the wall or floor into your pass through so that when you plug in the sensor, the sensor and sensor cable follow the same path as the xray tube arm. This will prevent you from tripping over the cable and damaging your sensor during use. If 16 feet will not get you to the pass through you may need to mount the unit at your 12 o’clock. If you do not have a pass through than try to route your usb cable over to the xray tube wall mount and locate your interface there. The idea is that if you are using the sensor, the tube head is pulled out and the arm of the tube head keeps you from walking across where your sensor cable is.

The sensor is of similar size to a Suni Ray or Schick sensor and has rounded corners. I would expect this sensor to be as comfortable as most sensors on the market.

Eva sensors come with their own included imaging software that is okay to use or if you would like they also work great in Xray Vision. I prefer Xray Vision in most cases, because of its ability to work with lots of different sensors, panos and phosphor plate systems.
-SuniRay-Suni Corporation (Orange Dental)

The Suni Ray is a direct in line USB sensor similar to the Kodak sensor. The sensor is attached to its own in line interface and has about 3 feet of cable here. The small interface about the size of a tin of mints has a mini USB female connection and comes with a 16 foot usb cable to plug into the interface. This sensor design is intended to be plugged into a powered hub located near your computer. In most of my installs I suggest having enough USB cables to have one plugged in in every room and simply move the sensor with its short cable and interface around. This is much easier than using the long 16 foot usb cable and moving it from room to room.

The sensor has rounded corners and a composite body. I have found the sensor to be comfortable to use and position.

Suni Ray sensors work in Prof Suni and Xray Vision. This is kind of redundant because Prof Suni is an OEM release of Xray Vision

-Planmeca ProSensor


The Planmeca sensor has an interface that the actual sensor plugs into. The interface has many different ways to be connected to the computer including USB and a network interface. The network interface is an excellent choice because you can place your interface any distance from the computer you choose. If you used the correct wireless device in conjunction with the interface and you know a computer guy who can set it up you wouldn’t even need to run a cable from your network to the interface.

The sensor itself is waterproof and of similar size to the other sensors in this review except for the Dexis which is smaller.

Planmeca sensors work in their own Dimaxis software and can also be utilized in Xray Vision

PLANMECA CORRECTIONS

Its called the Planmeca ProSensor…. The picture you use even shows that. :) Dixi was replaced by it.

The warranty program is 10 years. 3 years 100% 3 years 50% 4 years 40% no fees. We have a 24 hour replacement after a dealer tech has confirmed the problem with our support (or even the office with them on the phone depending on the issue)

We are integrated directly into Romexis (our SW that replaced Dimaxis awhile ago for 2D and 3D in one) Eaglesoft, MacPractice, Dolphin, and others.

The images are on a few of our websites. Also I have posted images on Dentaltown in the past comparing it to SUNI sensors in MacPractice. From the same office, same computer, tubehead, anatomy, etc. If you would like some images let me know.

The pricing is adjustable. We have trade-ins for current digital users, we bundle them with Pans, we bundle them with Intra X-Rays, we offer buy 2 get one… etc. Also Pricing is determined by the dealer, and we do have a few distribution partners therefore we cannot post pricing.”

-Anonymous

-Dexis Platinum-Dexis

The new Dexis Platinum has no interface. It has a cable that comes directly out of the sensor and ends in a standard USB B Connection that can be plugged into the computer USB ports. The downside of this is that the connector is only good for about 1000 disconnects meaning after about 1000 patients you will probably start having problems with the sensor plug if you are unplugging it and moving it after each patient. The cable is pretty long and most likely would need to be plugged in wherever your computer is and draped across the floor to your patient when in use.

Dexis sensors only work in Dexis Image from what I have been told although I know that drivers were made for it to work in Xrayvision for when the sensor is used in conjunction with the US military.

-CDR Elite-Schick

Schick Sensor Interface

Schick Sensor Plug For Interface

This sensor plugs in through its own interface that has another cable that comes out of it and plugs in through USB to the computer. As far as placement of the sensor you will probably want to place the interface at the computer location because you wouldn’t want to damage the cable going to the interface by running it through your walls. The interfaces for these schick sensors are close to $2K a piece so be careful with them.

Schick sensors work in Dentrix Image through a module you download, through eaglesoft image and with xray vision. I have only used the sensor in eaglesoft and xray vision. If you use eaglesoft image you may want to go into the settings and change the acquisition timer. By default I believe it is set to less than a minute so if you hit the acquire button before positioning the sensor the acquisition may time out before you take the xray.

-Kodak RVG6100- Kodak (Owned By Carestream Now)

Kodak RVG 6100 Sensor

Kodak RVG 6100 Sensor

Kodak sensors are very similar to the Suni Ray as to how they plug in. They have an interface that is very small that is attached directly to the sensor through a cable. Then you use a USB cable to plug into the interface. As far as functionality the Kodak works similar to the Suni Ray.

Kodak sensors work in Kodak Image and in Xray Vision. Kodak only recently released the drivers to interface with Xray Vision so if you have Kodak Image and don’t like it feel free to buy Xray Vision and switch over.

If you have any questions or comments please either comment on the post or visit http://www.sodiumdental.com/dental-technology-integrators-contact-us/

Dental Patient Anxiety; How To Relieve Patient Anxiety

Dental Patient Anxiety; How To Relieve Patient Anxiety

Dental patient anxiety
It is estimated that as many as 75% of US adults experience some degree of dental fear, from mild to severe. Approximately 5 to 10 percent of U.S. adults are considered to experience dental phobia; that is, they are so fearful of receiving dental treatment that they avoid dental care at all costs. Many dentally fearful people will only seek dental care when they have a dental emergency, such as a toothache or dental abscess. People who are very fearful of dental care often experience a “cycle of avoidance,” in which they avoid dental care due to fear until they experience a dental emergency requiring invasive treatment, which can reinforce their fear of dentistry.

Women tend to report more dental fear than men, and younger people tend to report being more dentally fearful than older individuals. People tend to report being more fearful of more invasive procedures, such as oral surgery, than they are of less invasive treatment, such as professional dental cleanings, or prophylaxis.

It has been found that there are two main causes of dental fear in patients; Direct Experiences and Indirect Experiences.

Direct experience is the most common way people develop dental fears.  We’ve found that a majority of people report that their dental fear began after a traumatic, difficult, or painful dental experience.  These reasons of course are not the only explanations of dental anxiety.  Another contributing factor is simply the perceived manner of the dentists as “impersonal”, “uncaring”, “Uninterested” or “cold” whereas dentists who are perceived as warm and caring actually counterbalance the fear caused by painful procedures.

Indirect experience can include vicarious learning, mass media, stimulus generalization, helplessness and perceived lack of control.  Through vicarious learning one may develop an anxiety simply by hearing of other peoples painful and traumatic experiences at their dentist’s office.  Mass media has negative portrayal of dentistry in television shows and children’s cartoons.

Stimulus generalization is another indirect experience causing a patient to develop a fear as a result of a previous traumatic experience in a non-dental context.  A major contributor of stimulus generalization is a patient’s traumatic experience at hospitals or general practice doctors that wear white coats and have antiseptic smells throughout their practices.  A way that a lot of dental practicioners have been combating this perception is by wearing clothing that isn’t so “lab coatish”.

Helplessness and perceived lack of control occurs when a person believes that they have no means of influencing a negative event.  Research has shown that a perception of lack of control leads to fear whereas a perception of having control lessens fear greatly.  For example, a dentist that tells a patient to raise their hand during a procedure to signal pain so that the dentist or hygienist can stop during the procedure will generate a much less fearful and anxious patient thus creating a more pleasant general experience influencing the patient to continue to come back for additional treatment.

A few great techniques that modern day dentists are implementing to reduce fear and anxiety are comfortable “massage” chairs, utilizing the “tell, show, do” technique, music via headphones, allowing their patients to bring in their own i-pods and even televisions in each operatory allowing the patient to choose what they would like to watch during their procedure.  Each one of these techniques offers the patient a perception of welcoming and warmness causing the patient to feel more “at home” and relaxed during a potentially stressful procedure.

Dental Practice SpaOne of our most productive clients actually offers an in-house masseuse that will relax the patient by offering a short massage prior to any dental treatment.  While this technique hasn’t been adopted by very many dental practices it has proven, for this particular doctor, to be a very effective way of reducing patient stress and anxiety.  The offer of an in-house masseuse also gives something for the patient to talk about once they leave the dentist’s office.  By having a pleasantly memorable experience with a personal masseuse at their dental practitioners office gives a means for positive referrals to friends and family.

The “tell, show, do” technique is widely adopted by most practitioners where the dentist, hygienist, and/or assistant will first explain the procedure to a patient, show a video or demonstrate with models how the procedure will be performed, and then continue on to actually perform the procedure.  The act of informing your patients exactly what is involved with a procedure gives the patient the background knowledge to be able to feel comfortable with what is about to happen during their visit.  This technique is especially important in the field of dentistry since all of the procedures are within the mouth and are not easily visible to the patient.

Over the past couple of years we have seen an influx in dental practitioners installing large LCD TV’s in each of their operatories providing the patient with a way to view their favorite television show or movie while enduring a procedure.  The use of LCD TV’s within a dental practice extends far beyond simply offering patient entertainment and relaxation.  An LCD TV that is linked to the operatory’s computer workstation provides the dentist, hygienist, and/or assistant a large canvas on which to display a patients digital x-rays, intra oral tooth images, and treatment plans.

The ability to clearly display problem areas and treatment plans on a large display allows the dental staff to more easily perform the “tell, show, do” technique by offering patient education videos that explain in detail with images and models how the patients procedure will be performed and how it will benefit them in the future once the procedure is complete.  Patient education videos combined with actual images of a patients problem areas via digital x-ray and intra oral images provides the dental staff with a solid foundation to promote patient acceptance thus increasing production within a practice.

Currently one of the leading ways of offering patient entertainment and education is with the use of a simple piece of software called Smile CinemaSmile Cinema gives the dental staff a quick and easy way to start a patient education video and/or a movie or tv show with a single click of the mouse.  Being able to do away with the current use of patient education DVD’s and entertainment DVD’s means less time spent by the dental staff finding DVD’s, loading them in the DVD player or computer and waiting for the movie to load.  While these things do not seem to consume very much time per patient when adding the time up over the course of a day it is easy to see that up to an hour per day or more could be saved by utilizing Smile Cinema.

Let’s just say that it takes as little as 3 minutes for a staff member to find the appropriate education or entertainment DVD, place it in the DVD player, and wait for the specific video to load.  With an average dental practice performing approximately 12 patient exams and treating approximately 10 patients per day the time spent on DVD media estimates to about just over 1 hour.  If a dental practice can save even just a single hour of time per day that equates to nearly 2 additional patients per day being treated within a practice.  Now just think about how much money can be produced if you were able to see an additional 2 patients per day (approx. 10 per week and 40 per month) and it’s very easy to see the benefits of having a product like Smile Cinema utilized within your practice.

For more information on how to purchase Smile Cinema or to take advantage of Sodium Systems installation team and have us assist you in outfitting your practice with LCD TV’s and computer systems contact us at 1-800-821-8962 or visit our Contact Us page to submit your information.

 

Some information gathered by Wikipedia.org

Week 3 – Digital Intra Oral X-Ray Sensors – The Good The Bad And The Ugly – Part 3

Week 3 – Digital Intra Oral X-Ray Sensors – The Good The Bad And The Ugly – Part 3

Digital Intra Oral X-Ray Sensors

-Good Image Quality – Part 1
-Reliability – Part 2
-Price – Part 3
-Functionality – Part 4

Part 3 is a very simple premise. It is an attempt to give doctors an opportunity to see digital X-Ray sensor pricing before they talk to sales reps from all of these companies.

Reviewed Sensors:
-Eva by Dent-X (AFP Imaging)
-SuniRay-Suni Corporation (Orange Dental)
-Dixi 3-Planmeca
-Dexis Platinum-Dexis
-CDR Elite-Schick
-Kodak RVG6100- Kodak (Owned By Carestream Now)

Part 3: Price

This is an easy blog to do except that it is going to require an incredible amount of Anecdotal data which is my least favorite kind of data. Sadly in this case it is the only data I am legally allowed to use. It seems that salesmen do not appreciate you taking sales sheets at a dental show and then listing all of the show prices on a website. So I am going to use figures that are rounded and if anyone has any more current corrections that are coming from actually seeing the numbers on an invoice or an estimate please comment on my blog and I’ll make the corrections. None of this data has come from any of my sales experience or personal price knowledge. All of this data has come from doctors that have been willing to show me estimates or invoices they were given for sensor pricing. I would never use actual sales data provided to me while I was working for a company.(It just wouldn’t be right and I am pretty sure it might be illegal)

-Eva by Dent-X (AFP Imaging)

$15,500- 2 Sensors, 2 Interfaces and AFP Imaging’s Image Software

0$ -3 Year Warranty
-SuniRay-Suni Corporation (Orange Dental)
$15,595  Sensors With Inline Interfaces Comes with Profsuni and one License Additional licenses are 250$ per computer you want to be able to take or view Xrays from

0$-2 Year Warranty

-Dixi 3-Planmeca

At this point the only information I have is a single sensor price quote of $9500

Dexis Platinum-Dexis
I have seen Dexis sold at different price ranges all from about $11,000 to $14,000 new

The software I have seen a variety of pricing but it looks like it runs from $8,000 to $11,0000

The warranty on the sensor is a per year warranty that is about $1,800 a sensor

-CDR Elite-Schick

Sensors run about $9,000 and interface boxes run at about $1,900 The warranty package is actually like a support package. It is a 160 a month or so per sensor and it doesn’t get you a free replacement sensor necessarily. From reading the document it actually provides you with just cheaper prices on replacement sensors but a replacement would still run you about $3,000. They are a good company though so I assume manufacturers defects would be covered and replaced at no charge.
-Kodak RVG6100- Kodak (Owned By Carestream Now)

Pricing from $8,000 to $9,000 a sensor, this sensor can be integrated into Xrayvision if you do no want Kodak Image

There are some large price differences here but I choose not to make any comments on them. If you read part 1 and part 2 you’ll see that you will not take an image quality hit going with the less expensive options and in some cases the warranties are much better in the less expensive options. I have personally called about warranty service on all of these products and have had no problems getting service if the product is covered under its warranty. Though in some cases you will pay substantially more for warranties on some sensors as I have listed above.

 

If you have any questions or comments please either comment on the post or visit http://www.sodiumdental.com/dental-technology-integrators-contact-us/